The meant for drones stop illegal drone usage?These are

The phone rings at the police station. It’s the hospital, with another report of a drone flying too close to the hospital building. This is illegal. Once again, the police have to turn them away; they cannot capture the drone’s owner because they do not know from where he/she is controlling the drone from. The drone itself can be captured, but there’s no use pressing charges against a plastic machine.This problem is present worldwide. There are plenty of technologies to disable drones, but catching the owner is difficult. The drone’s owner has broken the law and should be prosecuted, but they cannot find the owner. Most drones that can fly over the the height limit and into illegal areas are controlled by apps, so this project will focus only on app-controlled drones. Can using the technology originally meant for drones stop illegal drone usage?These are some general rules about drone usage. It is illegal to fly an unregistered UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System). (Unmanned Aircraft Systems Frequently Asked Questions, 2018). A UAS is defined as “an aircraft that is operated without the possibility of human intervention from within or on the aircraft”. (Unmanned Aircraft Systems Frequently Asked Questions, 2018). Part 107 (Small UAS Rule) states unmanned aircraft must – weigh less than 55 pounds with payload at takeoff, fly in class G airspace, be within line-of-sight, fly at or below 400 feet, fly during the day or civil twilight, fly at or below 100 miles per hour, yield right-of-way to manned aircraft, not fly directly over people, and not fly from a moving vehicle unless in a sparsely populated area (Unmanned Aircraft Systems Frequently Asked Questions, 2018). These are some general rules and expectations while flying a drone.There are some more rules and expectations while flying a drone. It is illegal to fly drones in state parks (Unmanned Aircraft Systems Frequently Asked Questions, 2018). It is generally recommended to stay away from flying over people, stadiums, or airports (Unmanned Aircraft Systems Frequently Asked Questions, 2018). Class G airspace is completely uncontrolled and is the only airspace that drones can fly in (Unmanned Aircraft Systems Frequently Asked Questions, 2018). These are some additional rules and expectations while flying drones.These are some facts about the different classes of airspace. Class A airspace operations must be conducted under IFR (Instrument Flight Rules). All aircraft must be subject to ATC (Air Traffic Control) clearance (ALC_Content, n.d.). Class B airspace operations may be conducted under IFR, SVFR (Special Visual Flight Rules), or VFR (Visual Flight Rules). All aircraft must be subject to ATC clearance (ALC_Content, n.d.).Class C airspace operations may be conducted under IFR, SVFR, and VFR. All aircraft must be subject to ATC clearance (ALC_Content, n.d.). Those are a few of the classes of airspace.         There are more classes of airspace. Class D airspace operations may be conducted under IFR, SVFR, or VFR. Aircraft operating under IFR or SVFR are subject to ATC clearance. VFR flights are not subject (ALC_Content, n.d.). Class E airspace operations may be conducted under IFR, SVFR, or VFR. Aircraft operating under IFR or SVFR are subject to ATC clearance. VFR flights are not subject (ALC_Content, n.d.). Class F airspace operations may be conducted under IFR or VFR (ALC_Content, n.d.). Those are some more classes of airspace.There are yet other classes of airspace, and each one represents its own part of the sky. Class G operations may be conducted under IFR or VFR (ALC_Content, n.d.). Class A airspace-18,000 feet MSL (Mean Sea Level) (ALC_Content, n.d.).Class B Airspace-10,000 feet MSL (ALC_Content, n.d.). Those are some heights that each airspace class represents.There are more classes of airspace and each have a different height. Class C airspace-4,000 feet AAL (Above Airport Elevation) (ALC_Content, n.d.). Class D airspace-2,000 feet AAE (ALC_Content, n.d.). Class E airspace-1,200 feet AAE (ALC_Content, n.d.). That is the end of the airspaces.This is how drones work and fly. There are 8 main drone parts- frame, motors, Electronic Speed Controls (ESCs), flight control board, radio transmitter/receiver, propellers, and the battery/charger (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The frame connects all other parts and is either in an X shape or a + shape (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The motors spin the propellers. A standard 4-propeller drone has 4 motors (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). Those are some drone parts and their function.Here are some more drone parts. ESCs are wired components that connect the motors and the battery, The ESCs also relay signals to the motors to tell it how fast it should spin (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The flight control board controls the accelerometer and gyroscopes (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The radio transmitter (remote control) and receiver (the antenna on the drone) controls the drone (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). Those are some important parts of a drone.These are the last few drone parts, and next is controlling it. The propellers help determine the drone’s height, speed, and direction (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The battery powers the drone and the charger charges it for multiple flights (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). There are 4 main quadcopter controls- roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). With that, the controls of a drone are entered.Now, let’s go in to more detail about the quadcopter controls. A roll moves your drone left or right (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). A pitch tilts the drone forward or backward, moving the drone forward or backward (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). A yaw rotates your drone clockwise or counterclockwise (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). That’s a little more detail about the control of a drone.This is the last control, then it’s time to move on to how to do them. The throttle gives your drone enough power to get airborne (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The controller’s right stick controls roll and pitch (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The controller’s left stick controls yaw and throttle (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). The controller’s trim buttons balance out the controls (How to Fly a Drone A Beginner’s Guide to Multirotor Systems, n.d.). That’s how to do yaw, pitch, roll, and throttle, and some info about trimming.         These are some legal cases that came up that involved drones. In July 2014, a man was arrested for flying a drone near a hospital in Ulster, New York (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). In September 2015, a police officer in Valdosta, Georgia was found to be privately operating a drone over his neighbor’s property on multiple occasions (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). A couple in Orem, Utah have been charged with using concealed electronic equipment on a drone to spy and record conversations (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). Those are some legal cases that involved drones.There are many more drone-involving legal cases, but here are just a few more. In October 2015 a man was found guilty of may charges after numerous incidents where he flew a drone over private property (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). In October 2015, a man was charged with stalking after flying a drone over security officers at the Dakota Pipeline protests (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). A drone crash in Seattle that injured 2 people resulted in the only known jail sentence for a drone crash (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). Those are some more legal cases involving drones.Here are some more legal incidents involving drones. In September 2016, a woman sued a fraternity at the University of Southern California and an event-planning company alleging she had suffered head injuries due to a drone crash (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). In 2015, March 2016, October 2016, and January 2017, 4 people were fined for drone crashes in New York (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). In 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017, several cases of close encounters with manned aircraft arose and led to charges (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). Those are some legal cases involving drones.There are several more legal cases involving drones. Here are the last few. In 2014, 2015, and 2016, several drone shoot-downs occured and were sent to court (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). Perhaps the most well-known legal case involving a drone shoot-down occurred as a result of an August 2015 incident in Kentucky in which a man shot down a drone that he claimed was invading his property. (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). In September 2016, 2014 and January 2017, several cases of illegal drone use were filed (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.).  In September 2015, September 2016, and March 2017, several instances of using drones to smuggle goods into correctional facilities were reported (Drone Incidents A Survey of Legal Cases, n.d.). Those are a couple more legal incidents involving drones.Next, we’ll examine how apps will revolutionize drones in the future. Drones used to be controlled by hand-held radio transmitters, but nowadays drones are controlled by apps (Murphy, 2015). With apps, drone users can see what drones see and locate restricted areas or obstacles(Murphy, 2015). New drone technology opens up a whole new league of autonomous, computer-powered drones (Murphy, 2015). That is how apps will revolutionize drones in the future.These are some previously tested ways to disable a drone. Guns are one way of disabling drones, but a dangerous one at that. Consequences may include reckless endangerment charges, laws relating to the discharge of firearms, and the offender may be liable to civil damages paid to the destroyed drone’s owner (Schaub & West, 2016). Nets are another way to disable drones. Police in Tokyo are trying it and several ideas for a net cannon have been considered (Schaub & West, 2016). Radio waves are are a very good way to stop drones. Battelle’s DroneDefender disrupts radio frequencies, takes control of the drone, and guides it safely to the ground (Schaub & West, 2016). Those are a few of the previously tested ways to disable drones.These are a few more ways to disable drones. Another way to disable drones is to hack it using an unsecured Wi-Fi port and take complete control over it (Schaub & West, 2016). Using eagles to capture drones mid-flight is a new idea being tested by the Dutch National Police and Guard From Above, an eagle training company (Schaub & West, 2016). The last and possibly weirdest way to stop a drone is to smack into it with a jetski (Schaub & West, 2016). Those are the last few ways to disable a drone.These are some anti-drone technologies. Boeing anti-drone “death ray” truck is a 10-kilowatt capable anti-drone laser and can function in heavy fog, rain and wind. It is known as the High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HELMD) (Margaritoff, 2017). Airbus Defense and Space’s counter UAV system uses operational radars, infrared cameras, and direction finders to identify and jam drones from between 5 and 10 kilometers away (Margaritoff, 2017). Battelle’s DroneDefender can attach to any gun and blocks radio, GPS, and ISM signals Then, the drone is told to return to its origin and land (Margaritoff, 2017). Those are a couple anti-drone technologies. These are some more anti-drone technologies. DroneShield’s DroneGun is similar to the Drone Defender. It uses electrical blocking and GLONASS positioning systems to take down drones 1.2 miles away (Margaritoff, 2017). Openwork’s Skywall fires four projectiles, all equipped with nets, up to 330 feet. It can be shoulder-mounted (model 100), stand-mounted (model 200), or a turret (model 300) (Margaritoff, 2017). China’s police force have come up with a signal-jamming gun of their own that can take down targets up to half a mile away (Margaritoff, 2017).DARPA will release a new anti-drone laser system in 2020. It will be easily upgradable and can be mounted on trucks and buildings. In addition to being able to defend against rockets, artillery, mortar, and other threats. (Margaritoff, 2017) Those are some other anti-drone technologies.There’s another anti-drone technology that disables drones (rather dramatically). Lockheed Martin developed a new anti-projectile system known as the Area Defense Anti-Munitions System (ADAMS) (Area Defense Anti-Munitions System Nullifies Rocket Attacks (VIDEO), n.d.). It will be used to protect vulnerable areas like military bases (Area Defense Anti-Munitions System Nullifies Rocket Attacks (VIDEO), n.d.).  It can track targets from 5 kilometers away and can destroy those targets from 2 kilometers away, setting the targets ablaze and eventually making them explode (Area Defense Anti-Munitions System Nullifies Rocket Attacks (VIDEO), n.d.). Now that’s a dramatic way to protect against UAVs, or anything, for that matter.This is a new technology to find a drone’s owner. The FAA signed an agreement to test technology that can locate the operator of drones flying illegally near airports (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). The technology tracks radio signals arriving to the drone and follows its path back to the operator within a 5-mile radius (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). The FAA receives about 100 reports a month from pilots of sightings of drones flying near planes and airports (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). That is some of the many facts about this fascinating new technology.Here’s some more info about this operator-finding tech. Even a drone weighing only a few pounds can cause serious damage if it’s sucked into an engine or crashes through the cockpit windshield (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). While capturing the drone itself is no problem, the FAA’s biggest challenge is tracking down the operator (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). The new technology “provides a proven way to passively detect, identify, and track” drones and their operators on the ground (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). That is some more info about this technology.Here’s some more info about this new technology. From November 2014 to August 2015 the FAA received more than 700 drone sighting  reports from pilots (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). The US forest service reported 18 unauthorized drone flights above or near wildfires, 10 of which hampered aerial firefighting (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). The near collisions and unauthorized drone operations have alarmed the lawmakers and the public; recreational users are suspected in most of the cases (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). There’s some more info!Here are some last few details about this technology. There have been “…interruptions in critical firefighting because of idiots operating their toy drone” (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). Some people believe the situation is exaggerated (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). Some sightings have turned out to be birds (Government Tests Technology to Find Illegal Drone Operators, n.d.). That’s all about this technology.         Now, let’s move on to a new, drone-recognizing technology. DJI is the world’s leader in civilian drones and aerial imaging technology (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). The AeroScope is DJI’s new solution to safety, security, and privacy concerns (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). AeroScope uses existing communication links between the drone and its controller (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). There’s some facts for you.This topic has a lot info, so here’s some more. The AeroScope can broadcast identification information such as a registration number or serial number, as well as basic telemetry, including location, altitude, speed, and direction (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Police, security agencies, aviation authorities and other authorized parties can use AeroScope to monitor, analyze, and act in its information about the incoming UAV (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). AeroScope has been installed at two international airports since April (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). That’s some more info about this new technology.Here’s some more information. Drones have become an everyday tool for personal and professional use (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Authorities want to make sure they can identify who is flying near sensitive locations or in ways that cause serious concern (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). The AeroScope addresses the need for accountability with technology that is simple, reliable, and affordable (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). That is some more information about AeroScope.Here’s some more info about AeroScope. DJI demonstrated the system in Brussels, Belgium (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). The AeroScope can immediately sense a drone as it powers on, then plot its location on a map while displaying a registration number, which is equivalent to a drone’s “license plate”, and authorities can use it to determine the owner of the drone (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). DJI released a white paper detailing the benefits of such an approach to electronic identification for drones (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). There’s some more AeroScope information.Here is some information about AeroScope. AeroScope works with all current models of DJI drones, which compromise over ? of the global drone market (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Since AeroScope transmits on a DJI’s communications link, it does not require on-board equipment or modifications, or require extra steps or cost (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Other drone manufacturers can easily configure existing and future drones to transmit signals in the same way (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). That is some more info about AeroScope.Here’s a little more about DJI’s new drone tracker. Because AeroScope relies on drones broadcasting signals to the controller and not to an internet-based service, it cannot be recorded in government databases (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Because AeroScope relies on drones broadcasting signals to the controller and not to an internet-based service, it cannot be recorded in government databases (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). This protects the privacy interests of people and businesses who use drones (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). This also avoids substantial costs and complexities that would be involved in creating databases and connecting drones to those databases (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). That’s some information about DJI’s drone tracker.Here’s some more info about DJI and its new technology. This system is consistent with DJI’s problem-solving approach to balance authorities need to identify drones and the pilot’s right to fly without surveillance (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). DJI leads the industry in safety and security such as geofencing and sense-and-avoid technology (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Drone identification settings will be included in DJI’s initial drone software to allow customers to choose the content of their drone’s identification broadcast (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). That is some more info about DJI’s AeroScope.Here’s the last bit of information about AeroScope. To protect customer’s privacy, the AeroScope system will not automatically transmit any personally identifiable info until needed, if needed at all (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017). Drone identification, thoughtfully implemented, can help solve policy challenges, head off restrictive regulations, and provide accountability without being expensive or intrusive for drone pilots (DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones, 2017).There are many different ways to take down or interfere with drones. There is SkyWall, DroneGun, DroneDefender, ADAMS defense, guns, nets, superdrones, eagles, hacking, jet skis, HELMD, Airbus Defense and Space’s counter-UAV system, and DARPA’s anti-aerial laser system. There are ways to find a drone’s operator as well, like the government-tested anti-drone technology, AeroScope, and the IsoLOG 3D. However, despite the efforts of the government, drone companies, and drone users, the problem of drone crime still remains. Instead of trying to stop illegal drone use when it happens, illegal drone use must be taken out of the picture altogether by putting coding in drone apps that stops all illegal drone use, like preventing a drone from flying over 400 feet or stopping it from going over 100 miles an hour.SOURCES  ALC_Content. (n.d.). Retrieved January 11, 2018, from https://www.faasafety.gov/gslac/ALC/course_content.aspx?cID=42&sID=505&preview=trueArea Defense Anti-Munitions System Nullifies Rocket Attacks (VIDEO). (n.d.). Retrieved January 20, 2018, from https://futuristicnews.com/area-defense-anti-munitions-system-nullifies-rocket-attacksD. (2017, October 12). DJI Unveils Technology to Identify and Track Airborne Drones. Retrieved January 23, 2018, from https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dji-unveils-technology-to-identify-and-track-airborne-drones-300535604.htmlDrone Incidents: A Survey of Legal Cases. (n.d.). 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